GIGYA – an SAP Company

What’s the significance of SAP’s announced purchase of GIGYA? There’s a lot of speculation out there, but for me I think it is pretty obvious. SAP is charging down the Cloud strategy, through acquisition and core product conversion. If we look at what SAP are driving, we have Cloud ERP, we have Cloud Markets, we have Cloud Expenses, we have Cloud Human Capital solutions, we have cloud customer engagement solutions, and we have Leonardo (SAP’s IOT solution framework). And there in lies the rub, we are starting to connect all sorts of things and they aren’t just in the business domain anymore. In fact a major component of IOT is branching out into people’s everyday personal lives, smart fridges, smart lighting, smart heating, in fact pretty much anything now……..and this presents a challenge. As more and more services are deployed and made available to Joe Public there needs to be a single sign on mechanism – and it’s nothing like what the IT community are used to.

It’s the era of the Social Networking single sign on using something from the big boys such as Google, Twitter, Facebook and perhaps Microsoft. That presents some challenges when your customer base is now a hybrid of business and public, more and more the case today as the middle men are slowly eroded.

SAP are saying this is to enhance the Hybris solutions, and yes it will be used that way for sure, but I think there is more to this acquisition than first glance.

 

 

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SAP in South Africa continues the digging……

There’s a scandal brewing in South Africa – first it was KPMG, then McKinsey and now SAP. Employees and by default the companies are alleged to have been involved in unethical business practices.

SAP took immediate action, placing four executive directors on “administrative leave” whilst getting in an independent law firm Baker Mckenzie to investigate. They’ve been doing this since July. SAP have been quick and vigorous in their reaction to allegations.

KPMG also announced they were undertaking an independent investigation using a respected independent South African law silk.

Mckinsey also hired a law firm Norton Rose Fulbright to investigate.

Meanwhile a leading PR company Bell Pottinger has been expelled from its trade body around more than questionable involvement in other activities, in South Africa, and is now heading into administration following abandonment by its customers.

 

What will be the outcome for SAP, KPMG, and McKinsey?

Retiring is sort of stressful……

The story goes…..it will be so relaxing when you retire.

It’s very early in my attempts to retire so maybe it’s just me, but so far I’ve not noticed this. More it’s a transformation. A move from paid for work to unpaid for work. One of my ex -work colleagues who is about to retire is using the phrase “Taking back control”  to describe this transformation. Unlike the politicians, I think he has hit the nail on the head.

There still has to be a plan, there still has to be financial records and controls, and execution is still key. And there still has to be work….it’s just different and more of what you want to do, rather than the dictatorial direction of the people at the top. But it’s still there….just work you want to do.

Never having been a business owner, I guess it’s a bit like that…….but my customer base is somewhat limited in comparison, just family and friends.

My journey has started, it will I guess never be complete until it is. I’ll still do a bit of SAP related things whilst people want me to, and it doesn’t impact my retirement because that is now the number 1 gig in town.

 

 

Update iOS 11 and Office 365…….don’t update yet!

STOP PRESS: Beware iOS 11 if you use Office 365 ……..there is serious bug with it. It’s being worked at the moment but companies are advising staff to not update to 11 until it is fixed.

Along comes iOS 11 and digital obsolescence……

There is a story on the BBC technology website today that indicates that the new iOS 11 imminent on your Apple devices will “kill” any old and unsupported apps. All of which got me thinking of digital obsolescence, a common and faster occurring phenomenon. All of us can recount items that have either disappeared or reduced to rare. Film vs digital, vinyl records vs cassette tape vs CD vs memory chip vs streaming, and so it goes on. But applications based on the Apple definition are those that were built and sold just 2 years ago.

Now the technical aware  will say – it’s not Apple its the hardware that is driving this change by adopting 64 bit based solutions vs 32 bit solutions. But actually 64 Bit is generating the environment for Apps to do more, faster and most importantly more potential for “big” memory. So who is driving what? Apps or hardware? Answer neither. It’s the consumer demanding more and more capability, and for things that were never possible before.

We talk “big data”, but for me “big memory” is more of the key that unlocks the doors of possibility.

Regardless of all this – losing some of my familiar and well loved Apps is still going to be a pain, but likely short lived.

STOP PRESS: Beware iOS 11 if you use Office 365 ……..there is serious bug with it. It’s being worked at the moment but companies advising staff to not update to 11 until it is fixed.

 

The Register reveals a Bug in SAP recruiting software

Bugs, they are plentiful at the moment. The Register today highlights the case where it’s possible to spoof your way into the system. It’s now fixed if you apply the note mentioned in the article.

But the alternative use of this bug described in the article, amused me….the concept of using the opening to register staff so they couldn’t apply to your competitors advertised jobs.

iPhone X….yes or no?

So to be clear, I’m not an Apple worshipper. I’m an iPad owner and think it’s great but I’ve never had an iPhone. Largely because I was one of those heretics that loved his Blackberry, and keyboard. And when Blackberry was swamped by the consumer commercialisation of Android and iOS to the extent that they lost nearly all their market share, I moved to Android. And actually I quite like Android. Even more so with the phones that Huawei were making at an extremely competitive price, with stacks of features that often exceeded some of the Samsung offerings.

So I was intrigued at what the iPhone X could bring to the market that would rival the original iPhone introduced 10 years ago (yes, it really is that long ago).

But I’m disappointed…..a depth sensing camera (which allows facial recognition), an all glass case (for wireless charging), a larger screen area and no home button. It looks good but is it worth $999? Or £999 in UK (can someone explain why it costs 30% more in the UK?). I’m not sure.

I am sure that Apple fans will rave about it, but apart from aesthetic virtues I can’t see the extra value and it sure doesn’t disrupt the market like the original did……but then I’m quite likely at the end of my current contract to move to a SIM only contract and not refresh my phone as it does everything I want, but maybe that’s just me.