SAP reveals more in South Africa….

SAP promised to reveal the results of its internal investigation at the end of October, and it seems there was fire behind that smoke. The South African headlines with “SAP apologises to South Africa, reveals truth over SOE and Gupta dealings”.

SAPs statement reads ““The investigation has not revealed any evidence of a payment to a South African government official, including Transnet and Eskom employees. It has, however, uncovered indications of misconduct in issues relating to the management of Gupta-related third parties. To this end, SAP has instituted formal disciplinary proceedings, in accordance with South African labour law, against three employees who were placed on administrative leave at the beginning of the investigation. SAP has been clear from the outset that it will not tolerate misconduct or wrongdoing.”

All credit for SAP for bringing in an independent team to review and more credit for introducing a policy of no sales commission will be paid in any countries where there is a perception of corruption score below 50 based on Transparency Internationals published league table of corruption which basically means that nearly two thirds of the worlds 176 countries drop into that category.

Advertisements

SAP Q3 Results are out…..rounding up what some of the press says.

The Register in it’s typical style, suggests some challenges “SAP reassures market: Cloud is sustainable, just don’t look at our wheezing bookings

Whilst Reuters highlights below market expectations and the reassurance that Q4 will be good   “Just relax, Europe’s tech leader SAP tells investors, fourth quarter will be dynamite“.

The FT though focuses on warnings of the impact of the strength of the Euro on SAP earnings “SAP leads warnings on euro strength hit to earnings”

My POV – Q4 is always a strong quarter for any software vendor, it’s when the deals are made and the discounts applied. The underlying interest is cloud sales as a percentage of the SAP business and what impact it has on licence revenue. The 2 key questions being, firstly is SAP getting new revenue from the business that it is putting all its effort into (Cloud and HANA)? And secondly is SAP adding to the revenue base with service subscriptions? And the answer…..probably too difficult to say.

I don’t normally do this….but

Someone reminded me it’s Christmas in just  10 weeks….again. And the retailers have started their stocking of the shelves and offers are starting to appear. Also today my Facebook page reminded me that last year a local A Capella group released a video for Christmas. I watched it again and it was still as good as last year, and I wanted to see how many of you would watch it on YouTube. See what you think click here.

This could get very messy……

I mentioned a growing scandal in South Africa a number of days ago. Well it seems that now others are concerned that links with those either under investigation or investigating, might drag them in and their links to those companies are now being questioned. It remains to be seen how this will be untangled, but there are some nervous corporates out there. Standard Bank is now considering its links to McKinsey and SAP and also having conversations with KPMG. As the old saying goes “there’s no smoke without a fire”. Question is where and what is the fire? Everyone is keeping very tight-lipped about it.

Retiring is sort of stressful……

The story goes…..it will be so relaxing when you retire.

It’s very early in my attempts to retire so maybe it’s just me, but so far I’ve not noticed this. More it’s a transformation. A move from paid for work to unpaid for work. One of my ex -work colleagues who is about to retire is using the phrase “Taking back control”  to describe this transformation. Unlike the politicians, I think he has hit the nail on the head.

There still has to be a plan, there still has to be financial records and controls, and execution is still key. And there still has to be work….it’s just different and more of what you want to do, rather than the dictatorial direction of the people at the top. But it’s still there….just work you want to do.

Never having been a business owner, I guess it’s a bit like that…….but my customer base is somewhat limited in comparison, just family and friends.

My journey has started, it will I guess never be complete until it is. I’ll still do a bit of SAP related things whilst people want me to, and it doesn’t impact my retirement because that is now the number 1 gig in town.

 

 

So exactly what is safe these days?

There’s a story in the Register that talks about a risk in SAP’s point of sale software. Even the biggest software suppliers are falling victims to flaws and exploits – so what can you do to lessen the risks in this dangerous digital world? The first thing to say is that things are as safe as the way you behave. Think of this as a war. You need to construct your defence, so think like a castle. You should have a layered defence, moats, walls, gates that you open and control who comes in, and you keep the crown jewels safe in the keep at the centre.

So think firewalls, think patches of each of your layers, and for your PII data think only expose what needs to be available on a need to know basis. And this is a never ending activity….because as fast as you build up your fortifications, someone somewhere will be digging that tunnel or designing that battering ram.

So keep up to date, stay vigilant and never, never become complacent.

Data – selling facts

I always visit the BBC News Website each day – I guess it’s my equivalent of a newspaper today – and today a story or rather facts caught my eye. Under the business section was a story about how the oil industry was crying out for support from the government in these suddenly low oil price times. This from organisations that were making record profits only months ago. Also on the page was a link to how much do you pay for your fuel, essentially a country by country comparison.

Diesel comparitive

Diesel comparative

Actually fascinating that the UK – an actual Oil Producer charges so much compared to others, Venezuela another producer charges so little at the other end of the scale. Why is it so? Well interestingly in both cases it is driven by politics and country finances. In the UK around 65% of the cost a consumer pays is tax to the government, whilst in Venezuela conversely it is the government subsidy that covers approximately 99% of the value.  Such extremes reflecting the extremes of political governance.

So sometimes the “facts” revealed by data can be astounding and produce outcomes that are not always expected.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-21238363